Spurtle, the Scotsman’s Equivalent of a Spoon

Box Elder Spurtle

Shakespeare immortalized the phrase, “To be or not to be? That is the…”But wait, allow me to interrupt. When you have cooked to perfection a cut of meat, say a hamlet, and want a side dish of eggs and mushrooms scrambled together; the real question is, “To spurtle or to spoon?”

The Spurtle in Hand

A spurtle fits your hand and forms a natural extension unrivaled by a spoon. It is equally at home scrambling eggs or stirring your breakfast porridge.

I suspect that the spurtle predates the spoon by some number of generations. Probably the spoon was invented by some spurtle-wielding cook grown tired of trying to dip out a bowl of soup. Then in our zeal to economize, we thought to make shift with a spoon alone.

Inherent in the question, “To spurtle or to spoon?” is the rediscovery of which promotes natural movements. Using a spurtle means using the joints of the arm in a natural motion. Spooning causes the wrist to move in a repetitively circular motion. So save your joints and spurtle after this.

If you are not able to turn your own spurtle, contact me for details on how to order. Cost: $25.00 plus shipping.

Ellis Hein, author of The Woodturner’s Project Book

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About Ellis Hein

I am a woodturner and the author of The Woodturner's Project Book. I have a life-long interest in the gospel preached by George Fox and the early Quakers. You can see some of my material on that subject at http://nffquaker.org/profiles/blog/list?user=1zw2th7nj9p89.
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